Wish you were Beer: Low Tide Brewing

Wish you were Beer:  A semi-regular posting on charleston’s hoppin’ craft brewery scene

This week’s feature: Low Tide Brewing on John’s Island.

Low Tide Brewing
Photo: Facebook User @Lowtidebrewing

20 years ago, John’s Island had one stop light. It was the way to get to Kiawah but was overlooked as a destination in its own rite. Now, John’s Island is on the up and up with real estate development through the roof, and a restaurant scene that draws crowds away from the famous eateries of downtown Charleston. This rural island is quickly becoming home to many must-do attractions. Recently, we went to one of our favorite craft breweries, Low Tide, for a lowcountry oyster roast and the opportunity to talk to the owner, Mike, about what makes this destination so special.

Charleston’s love for oysters is as deep rooted as our live oaks and southern hospitality. Anyone lucky enough to visit our lovely city during the “off season” is in fact visiting during peak oyster season.  Low Tide Brewery takes advantage of this, hosting a monthly, all-you-can-eat oyster roast with live music and unique beer pairings at an unbeatable price of $15 – $20 per ticket. The time tested rule with oysters: they’re best to eat during months that contain the letter “r.” This means September through April, you’d be hard pressed to visit during a weekend when there isn’t a lowcountry oyster roast somewhere. While Low Tide is not the sole venue to catch a great oyster roast, it stands out from the crowd as a guaranteed good time with great drinks.

Low Tide Brewing Oyster Roast
Photo: Facebook User @Lowtidebrewing

Lowtide is unique in how their beer connects and exemplifies the things that make Charleston great: the people, the food and the environment. From the conception of the brewery’s name (which came to Mike while kayaking in Charleston’s tidal rivers), to the everybody’s-a-local atmosphere in the taproom, to the packed events and sought-after food trucks, the connection to this great city is enhanced by their beer. It’s a can’t miss destination for locals and newcomers alike.

Reflecting the mix between classic styles and fusions of flavors that the Charleston culinary scene is known for, Low Tide has produced over 120 distinct beers since opening. Mike gives a lot of credit to the “liquid engineer” of the operation, his partner, Andy. After accepting resumes from across the globe, Andy stood out from the crowd. Receiving a 4 year degree in fermentation, brewing was never a hobby to him but a profession. Because of Andy’s expertise, he is no one beer pony and a key ingredient in Low Tide’s success.

Low Tide Brewing Beer
Photo: Facebook User @Lowtidebrewing

While other breweries might have one or two experimental beers that are good or focus all their attention on one variety of beer, Low Tide strives to provide a range in styles and ace every one. They are constantly rotating and releasing new brews with names like “Gingerly Squeeze My Lemons”, “Coconut Pete’s Chai Ale”, and “Hush Your Mouth Triple IPA”, but typically only 12 or so are on draught in the taproom at a time. This keeps things fresh in the tap room, there is always something new to try.

Andy’s prowess allows Mike’s vision for Low Tide to become a reality through their beer. The “Coastal Harvest Gose” was a great example of the ingenuity going on behind the scenes. A gose is a sour beer originating in Gosland, Germany dating back 1000 years. While the original gose historically owes its unique flavor profile to the River Gose’s high saline content, Low Tide used “sea pickles” harvested by Mike from some of Charleston’s salt marshes to emulate the salty element of the classic. The beer was a unique twist on the classic and emphasized Low Tide’s ties to Charleston’s environment.

Low Tide Brewing Beers
Photo: Facebook User @Lowtidebrewing

While there has been talk about future plans for bottling, currently, you can only get their beer at the brewery itself or at restaurants lucky enough to have it on tap. It isn’t particularly rare to find them on tap at restaurants featuring craft brew selections because they ship kegs statewide. If you’re looking for a restaurant in Charleston that has them on tap we would recommend trying Bohemian Bull, Bay Street Biergarten, or Loggerheads. There are even some restaurants around Charleston that are lucky enough to have their exclusive, signature brew created by Lowtide as a compliment to their menu and atmosphere. So, only at Triangle Char & Bar can you find the delectable “Triangle Char & Bar Welcome Wheat” and out on Kiawah, the infamous Ocean Course Clubhouse features its very own “Ocean Course Ale”.

Mike’s original concept was to create a brewery to cater to Charleston’s rich restaurant scene focusing on creating those signature brews and the taproom was meant to be more of a bonus. Less than two years after opening the doors of the large converted warehouse that calls home, there are times when Mike wishes that there was more space. As the brewery evolved, it gained a dedicated following of both locals and visitors alike. The extent of their popularity is most astounding during their events, like their Oyster Roasts, when the whole front lot is closed off to allow for the crowds overflowing out of the taproom.

Apart from great beer and great times, the crowds grow because everyone is welcome here. No matter where you’re from you are treated like a local. Mike mentioned how important it is to him to make everyone feel comfortable, and it shows. When scanning the crowd at the oyster roast there wasn’t an obvious archetype for the typical low tide patron. Young, old, a number of families with their kids, people who have lived on John’s Island their whole life, others visiting for the first time, and (in the Charleston way) everyone brings their dogs. While Mike admits that he never thought that he would be so happy to have dogs and kids running around his brewery, it means a lot to him to see that there is such a sense of community that has developed around the taproom and their brews.

Low Tide Brewing
Photo: Facebook User @Lowtidebrewing

Take a trip out to John’s Island and stop by Low Tide Brewing next time you’re in town. You can follow them and check out all their upcoming events on their facebook page and find more information about them on their website. Hope to see you there!

Thanksgiving on the Charleston Coast

Thanksgiving on the Charleston Coast is the start of a wonderful holiday season. The weather is idyllic, the food is world-class, and the relaxation is top-notch! Read below for our recommendations on what to do, where to eat, and, most importantly, where to relax!

Sunset - Thanksgiving on the Charleston Coast
Folly Beach, SC

First things first, let’s discuss the weather. The best weather in Charleston is in late fall/early winter. The average temperature is 67°F with sunny skies. This may sound cold to us Charlestonians, but we all know that if the sun is shining it can feel closer to 70°F or higher! That’s splendid weather for a long walk on one of the Charleston Coast beaches. Fun fact: Thanksgiving day in 2016 produced a high of 76°F with sunny skies – pretty perfect if you ask us!

Wild Blue Ropes - Thanksgiving on the Charleston Coast
Photo: Wild Blue Ropes

To take advantage of the beautiful Charleston Coast weather, head outside! Your first stop (besides the beach!) should be Wild Blue Ropes for the annual Make Room for Turkey Day climb! Held the Wednesday before Thanksgiving (November 22), this event encourages people to get outside and be active! Located just a short drive from Folly Beach, Wild Blue Ropes is a fun adventure for the entire family.

Turkey Day Run - Thanksgiving on the Charleston Coast
Photo: Turkey Day Run & Gobble Wobble

Before indulging in the Thanksgiving feast, head downtown for the 40th Annual Turkey Day Run & Gobble Wobble 5K. Considered a Lowcountry Thanksgiving tradition, the Turkey Day Run & Gobble Wobble loops through Historic Charleston, beginning and ending with a party in Marion Square! Take in the sites of Historic Charleston and the fun costumes many people wear.

After running (or walking) the streets of Charleston Thanksgiving morning, it’s time for a feast! If you don’t feel like cooking, Charleston has many fabulous restaurants that are open for Thanksgiving dinner. Check out Eater Charleston for their list of open restaurants. We recommend making a reservation to ensure you have a table!

Isle of Palms - Thanksgiving on the Charleston Coast
Isle of Palms, SC

On Saturday, head downtown to Marion Square for the Charleston Farmers Market or venture to one of the many plantations. If relaxation is more your style, head to the beach! Grab a beach chair or a blanket and your favorite book and set up shop on your own slice of paradise. For relaxed dining after a day at the beach, head to one of the local restaurants on Folly Beach, Isle of Palms, or Sullivan’s Island!

The Charleston Coast is your oyster for Thanksgiving week. Part of the Lowcountry lifestyle is enjoying good food with those you love and Thanksgiving is the perfect holiday to embrace this tradition!