Our Offices and Team

Our Offices

Isle of Palms & Wild Dunes Office

+1 (888) 250 8730

Physical Address - FedEx or UPS

1400 Palm Boulevard

Isle of Palms, SC 29451

US Postal Service Mailing Address

PO Box 524

Isle of Palms, SC 29451

Folly Beach Office

+1 (888) 250 8730

Physical Address - FedEx or UPS

31 Center Street

Folly Beach, SC 29439

US Postal Service Mailing Address

PO Box 150

Folly Beach, SC 29439

Our Team

Finley Ferro
Courtney Kretly
Mark Malone
Suzie Miller
Carly Rhodes
Liz Spencer
 
 
 
 

Why we love the chairs...
 
Chairismatic
Generations have learned to lean back and relax in the all-American Adirondack chair.


Birth: One summer day in 1903, hobbyist woodworker Thomas Lee took a few spare planks and nailed up a casual, outdoorsy chair for his getaway home in Westport, New York.The nut of Lee’s idea was the use of wide, flat arms to hold tumblers, ashtrays, and reading material. He showed his creation to a carpenter friend, Harry Brunell, who modified the construction, applied for a patent, and secured himself a most comfortable and permanent seat in the history of furniture design.

Origins: The Westport chair - a.k.a the Adirondack chair - began as a book. Adventures in the Wilderness by Boston pastor William Murray was first published in 1869 and promptly stirred up a cedar-scented fervor of naturalism. Murray extolled the virtues of the Adirondack timberlands, claiming that mountain vapors provided spiritual refreshment and that exposure to natural splendors could restore health. By the late 1880s, enormous resorts had blossomed on the shores of the region’s many pristine lakes, and a wholly American phenomenon - camps - soon followed. These camps were not shelters of poles and canvas but sprawling log estates, vacation paradises the for the likes of J.P. Morgan and Alfred Vanderbilt. Forget the padded bergere, attendant tea table, and neurotic Pomeranian pouting on the Aubusson. In the early 1900s, substantial wealth was best expressed by a carpet of pine needles, a beagle, and gin fizz perched on the wooden arm of a Westport chair. While the ordinary rich had to content themselves with silken trappings, the privileged few went smugly rustic. The architects and designers they summoned learned to blend sophisticated taste with local quicks and crafts and eventually produced an endearingly funky camp style. From this, the Adirondack chair would emerge as a treasured symbol of unrepentant leisure.

Why it works today: Produced with a various modifications and stylistic interpretations for nearly a century, the sturdy Adirondack chair retains a low-slung design recline that is part throne, part hammock. Generous proportions and deeply reclined back sanction both the insouciance of a king and the contented reticence of a slacker, encouraging either to relax, swirl the ice, and gaze contentedly upon their own happy camp.


The "Chairismatic" article originated in TRADITIONAL HOME magazine. The April 2001 issue, written by John Riha